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ERIC Number: ED523413
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 193
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1243-4423-2
ISSN: N/A
Purposeful and Targeted Use of Scientists to Support In-Service Teachers' Understandings and Teaching of Scientific Inquiry and Nature of Science
White, Kevin
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Illinois Institute of Technology
Efforts have been made to enhance teachers' understanding and teaching of NOS and/or SI by immersing teachers into the field and lab work of scientists through intensive summer institutes. Results have been mixed and the samples have been small. This may be due to several factors: implicit strategies to learn and teach about NOS and/or SI (Schwartz, Lederman, & Crawford, 2004), experiences lasting as little as two weeks (Morrison, Raab, & Ingram, 2009), lack of teacher availability during the school year or summer, intimidation of subject matter or scientists, etc. The challenge remains to see if scientist-teacher collaborations are a meaningful and effective way to enhance teachers' understandings and instruction of NOS and SI. Learning about scientists and their culture while experiencing explicit instruction of NOS has demonstrated improved understandings of NOS (Bianchini & Colburn, 2000). However, Morrison, Raab, and Ingram (2009) identify that there is still a shortage of literature available addressing how teachers' view of NOS and SI may be impacted through interactions with scientists when not involved in authentic research. To this author's knowledge, there is no research available that investigates teachers' instruction of NOS and SI while in the same condition. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships of in-service teachers' views of scientists, their understandings of NOS and SI, their view of teaching NOS and SI while engaged in a professional development experience that provided participants with a sustained immersion into the culture, beliefs and knowledge of scientists while in a NOS and SI course. Teachers showed substantial changes (pretest to posttest) on all seven aspects of NOS. And, as with NOS, teachers showed substantial improvement on all four aspects of SI investigated. The results of this investigation suggest an approach to teaching nature of science and scientific inquiry that may be an effective, lasting and efficient use of scientist- teacher educator collaborations. This is not to imply that a scientist-science teacher educator collaboration is more effective than in its absence. However, a sustained and more choreographed teacher-scientist relationship may be a good format for in-service scientist-science teacher educator programs. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A