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ERIC Number: ED523109
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 165
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1243-9672-9
ISSN: N/A
Keeping 'Em Down on the Farm: Retention Best Practices for Hybrid/Blended Courses at the Community College Level
Hackemann, Sandra I.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Capella University
This limited study provided the first step in exploring existing information mined from a statewide community college Student Information System (SIS) regarding blended, online, and face-to-face instructional methods courses. The purpose was to explore the retention claims of blended instructional method courses, retention of face-to-face and online instructional methods courses, student success with each type of course, and student lack of success with each type of course at the community college level. The study, which would have been considerably more significant and convincing had the resulting sample size available been larger, assumed that blended learning instructional method courses had equal or higher student retention and equal or higher student success that could be validated through an examination of existing data. The expected relationships were that blended and face-to-face instructional methods courses had equivalent completion, retention and success rates and that online instructional method courses had lower completion, retention and success rates. This limited study replicated data results from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the University of Central Florida where student satisfaction with blended instructional method courses was higher than with online instructional method courses and in most cases equal to face-to-face instructional method courses. Students in blended instructional method courses achieved better grades than those in face-to-face instructional method courses, had lower withdrawal rates than online instructional method courses, and had retention percentages equivalent to face-to-face instructional method courses. At the target institution for this study, students in the one blended instructional method course for which data were analyzed were found to achieve better grades than those in face-to-face instructional method courses, to have lower withdrawal rates than face-to-face and online instructional methods courses, and to have better retention percentages than face-to face and online instructional methods courses. Although the sample size for this quantitative study was small, it did show that data exist to argue for a closer review of blended instructional methods sections in comparison with face-to-face and online instructional methods sections of the same course at the community college level. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education; Two Year Colleges
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Florida; Wisconsin