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ERIC Number: ED522760
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 114
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1242-9218-2
ISSN: N/A
The Effects of Cardiovascular Exercise on College Students' Learning, Recall, and Comprehension
Salis, Andrea S.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, City University of New York
Research on physical activity and cognition is based on the existing theoretical and empirical evidence which indicates that engaging in cardiovascular exercise improves cognitive capabilities, by increasing neural functioning which improves learning (cognitive development). The question this research sought to answer was to determine whether or not (a) increased amounts of exercise improves cognitive recall and comprehension; and (b) there is a difference in cognitive "recall" and comprehension abilities when engaging in exercise occurs "before" a learning activity as compared to "after" a learning activity. This experimental pretest-posttest study examined whether or not a physical activity intervention improved community college students' "recall" and "comprehension" of recently learned information. The cardiovascular exercise intervention included two levels: moderate and light exercise. In one sequence the rehearsal of information (i.e., learning) took place "before" the students' engaged in exercise and in an alternate sequence, "after" the students have engaged in exercise. The results of the study demonstrated that performing a moderate amount of exercise "before" or "after" rehearsing for a "comprehension" test significantly improved test results. The moderate exercise group also scored higher on the "recall" posttest than the no exercise group, yet this difference was not found to be significant. Performing a light amount of exercise demonstrated improvement in comparison to not performing any exercise. Yet, this difference was not found to be significant. Overall, the results of the research demonstrated a significant positive linear trend between increased levels of physical activity and "comprehension". [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A