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ERIC Number: ED522759
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 196
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1243-2293-3
ISSN: N/A
The Effects of Choice on Student Persistence, Academic Satisfaction, and Performance in Both Online and Face-to-Face Adult Education
DeCosta, James William
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, TUI University
The researcher examined the effects of online (OL) and face-to-face (FTF) course modality choice, as a motivational component, on students. self-selection of courses. A naturally occurring control and treatment group comparison design was employed. The participants were 435 college students (200 OL and 235 FTF) who attended an accredited private college offering associate, baccalaureate, and graduate degrees in the western United States. The research variables included student choice of modality (either OL or FTF), the covariates were student employment status (i.e., not employed, employed part-time, or employed fulltime), student dependent status (i.e., no dependents, one dependent, or two or more dependents), online experience with the course management system (i.e., no previous experience, one, two, three or more previous courses), and students. GPA, gender, and age. Data were collected from institutional records and analyzed through descriptive statistics and multiple regression analyses. The findings revealed no difference in either student achievement or satisfaction within or across course modality due to student choice of course modality. Student choice of modality affected FTF course drops. The IV choice of modality had significant relationship to course completions, which indicated that choice of modality decreases the chance of completing courses. These findings support institutional decisions in helping students with course modality selection and in developing policies and procedures that may lead to increased retention, student performance, and student satisfaction. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Adult Education; Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A