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ERIC Number: ED522729
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2006-Jan
Pages: 8
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Helping the Most Vulnerable Infants, Toddlers, and Their Families: Executive Summary. Pathways to Early School Success. Issue Brief No. 1
Knitzer, Jane; Lefkowitz, Jill
National Center for Children in Poverty
Compelling evidence from neuroscience about how early relationships and experience influence the architecture of the brain, and in turn early school success, has led to increasing policy and practice attention to implementing child development and family support programs like Early Head Start for infants and toddlers. But, there is also a group of babies, toddlers, and parents who face so many risks that programs like these alone may not be enough. This issue brief focuses on the special challenges of helping babies and toddlers whose earliest experiences, environments, and especially relationships create not a warm and nurturing atmosphere, but what scientists have called "toxic stress"--exposing them to such high and consistent levels of stress that their growing brains cannot integrate their experiences in ways that promote growth and learning. It describes 10 strategies that programs and communities can implement to ensure these babies, toddlers, and families are connected to sufficiently intensive supports that can get them on a path to early school success. (Contains 11 endnotes.) [For the full report, "Helping the Most Vulnerable Infants, Toddlers, and Their Families. Pathways to Early School Success. Issue Brief No. 1", see ED522730.]
National Center for Children in Poverty. 215 West 125th Street Third Floor, New York, NY 10027. Tel: 646-284-9600; Fax: 646-284-9623; e-mail: info@nccp.org; Web site: http://www.nccp.org
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Early Childhood Education; Preschool Education
Audience: Policymakers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Center for Children in Poverty