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ERIC Number: ED522653
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 130
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1241-6612-4
ISSN: N/A
The Effects of Partner-Check Self-Recording of On-Task Behavior on Academic Productivity in Children with Behavior Problems
Ohakamnu, George N.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Walden University
Due to an increase in behavior problems among school children, especially at-risk children who have problems staying on-task, there is a need for a teaching strategy that will enable children to be focused and on task in the classroom. This quantitative study investigated whether partner-check self-recording of on-task behavior will increase the academic productivity of children with behavior problems and whether partner-check self-recording of on-task behavior will increase the on-task behavior of children with behavior problems. The theoretical foundations of the study were based in behavior modification. A between-groups design with a convenience sample of 51 students who were assigned to intervention and control groups was employed. The collected data included pretest and posttest scores obtained from New York State fifth-grade standardized mathematics test. An independent t test revealed that pre to post gains of the intervention group were significantly greater than those of the control group, t (42) = 4.91, p less than 0.01, two tailed. Comparative gain scores indicated that the intervention group made more academic gains than the control group. Partner-check self-recording also provided a safe learning environment due to increased on-task behavior among participants who were actively involved during the intervention. This finding validates an alternative classroom management style for teachers. Children with behavior problems may remain on task for a longer period of time and thus increase productivity in the classroom. The study effects social change by helping at-risk children learn, complete schooling, and adopt more generalized patterns of cooperative and productive social interactions with others beyond the classroom. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Grade 5
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: New York