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ERIC Number: ED522607
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 161
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1240-4037-0
ISSN: N/A
The Effects of Self-Directed Teams in an Automotive Manufacturing Environment
Shall, David W.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Wayne State University
This study compares self-directed work structures to more traditional supervised work structures in order to determine if the expenditures and efforts required to implement self-directed work teams are warranted. Multiple internal performance metrics are examined in comparing plant work structures in various degrees of implementation between traditional work structures and self-directed work teams. The researcher collected data from multiple organizations within Ford Motor Company and four participating North American Ford production plants. Two Ford assembly plants and two Ford engine manufacturing plants were researched. Performance data from the 2004 production year were examined in each facility. Both assembly plants built the same Ford F-150 pick-up truck and both engine manufacturing plants produced the same V-6 engine in 2004. Data were collected to answer several questions including: (1) Does the presence of effectively rated self-directed work teams affect injury frequency; (2) Does the presence of effectively rated self-directed work teams affect injury severity; (3) Does the presence of effectively rated self-directed work teams affect unexcused absenteeism; (4) Does the presence of effectively rated self-directed work teams affect productivity; (5) Does the presence of effectively rated self-directed work teams affect cost performance; (6) Does the presence of effectively rated self-directed work teams affect external quality and customer satisfaction; (7) Does the presence of effectively rated self-directed work teams affect internal engine manufacturing quality; (8) Are Safety LTR, Safety SV, AWOL, Productivity, and Cost statistically significant predictors of customer satisfaction and, (9) Are Safety LTR, Safety SV, AWOL, Productivity, and Cost statistically significant predictors of work team effectiveness. By comparing the performance metrics and customer satisfaction data between like plants with separate and different work structures, the researcher isolated the impact that work structures have on safety, cost, productivity, quality and employee morale. The hypothesis in this research suggests that significant performance differences exist between effectively rated self-directed work teams and more traditionally supervised work groups in automotive assembly and engine manufacturing plants. Furthermore the hypotheses suggest that dependent performance variables predict customer satisfaction and work team effectiveness. Several statistical procedures were used to answer the nine research questions which ranged from basic to theoretically experimental procedures. First, causal comparisons were drawn between plants with effectively rated self-directed work teams and plants with more traditionally supervised work structures to explore the relationship that the dependent performance metrics have with the independent work structures. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to simultaneously test correlation between two independent predictor variables and several dependent variables. Second, a Hybrid Structural Equation Model (SEM) was utilized to further test and predict relationships between dependent and independent variables, but also within the dependent performance metrics. The technique allowed confirmatory and exploratory modeling to reveal the magnitude of performance variable interrelationships and predict their potential impact on customer satisfaction and work group effectiveness. Statistical techniques increasingly dissected data with the goal of answering each research question with error-free statistical results. The two final research questions asked if the dependent performance variables in the study were statistically significant predictors of customer satisfaction and work team effectiveness. Beta Coefficients from the Hybrid Structural Equation Model estimated that three variables influenced performance including safety lost time case rate, safety severity rate and productivity. The multivariable interaction of these dependent variables resulted in a statistical prediction that positive internal performance affects customer satisfaction but not work team effectiveness ratings. This work adds relevant research findings to the body of literature in human performance improvement and instructional technology. Individuals contemplating an intervention involving teams or a work structure change are well served using this dissertation as a resource. To the extent possible the research follows Ford Motor Company.s path along the human performance technology (HPT) model (Van Tiem, Moseley, Dessinger, 2004) that is endorsed by the International Society for Performance Improvement. (Abstract shortened by UMI.) [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Adult Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A