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ERIC Number: ED522164
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 16
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 6
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Can Teachers Be Evaluated by Their Students' Test Scores? Should They Be? The Use of Value-Added Measures of Teacher Effectiveness in Policy and Practice. Executive Summary. Education Policy for Action Series
Corcoran, Sean P.
Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University (NJ1)
"Value-added" measures of teacher effectiveness are the centerpiece of a national movement to evaluate, promote, compensate, and dismiss teachers based in part on their students' test results. Federal, state, and local policy-makers have embraced these measures in recent years as a means to objectively quantify teacher quality and to identify, reward, and retain teachers with a demonstrated record of success. Few can deny the intuitive appeal of value-added assessment: if a statistical model can isolate a teacher's unique effect on achievement, the possibilities seem endless. Teacher quality is an immensely important resource, and research has found that teachers can and do vary widely in their effectiveness (e.g., Kane, Rockoff & Staiger 2008). Common measures of teacher qualifications, such as experience and college selectivity, typically provide minimal information about individual teachers' effectiveness. Value-added holds out the promise that the elusive concept of "teacher quality" can be objectively and precisely measured. However, these tools have limitations and shortcomings that are not always apparent to interested stakeholders--including teachers, principals, and policy-makers--or even to value-added advocates. In the report this executive summary is based on, the author provides an introduction to these new measures of teaching effectiveness; describes prominent value-added systems currently in use in New York City and Houston; assesses the potential for value-added measurement to improve student outcomes, using these programs as empirical case studies; and outlines some important challenges facing their implementation in practice. This executive summary summarizes these concepts and findings. [For the full report, "Can Teachers Be Evaluated by Their Students' Test Scores? Should They Be? The Use of Value-Added Measures of Teacher Effectiveness in Policy and Practice. Education Policy for Action Series," see ED522163.]
Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University. Brown University Box 1985, Providence, RI 02912. Tel: 401-863-7990; Fax: 401-863-1290; e-mail: AISR_Info@brown.edu; Web site: http://www.annenberginstitute.org
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University
Identifiers - Location: New York; Texas
IES Cited: ED563445