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ERIC Number: ED522163
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 46
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 70
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Can Teachers Be Evaluated by Their Students' Test Scores? Should They Be? The Use of Value-Added Measures of Teacher Effectiveness in Policy and Practice. Education Policy for Action Series
Corcoran, Sean P.
Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University (NJ1)
Value-added measures of teacher effectiveness are the centerpiece of a national movement to evaluate, promote, compensate, and dismiss teachers based in part on their students' test results. Federal, state, and local policy-makers have adopted these methods en masse in recent years in an attempt to objectively quantify teaching effectiveness and promote and retain teachers with a demonstrated record of success. Attention to the quality of the teaching force makes a great deal of sense. No other school resource is so directly and intensely focused on student learning, and research has found that teachers can and do vary widely in their effectiveness (e.g., Rivkin, Hanushek & Kain 2005; Nye, Konstantopoulos & Hedges 2004; Kane, Rockoff & Staiger 2008). Furthermore, teacher quality has been found to vary across schools in a way that systematically disadvantages poor, low-achieving, and racially isolated schools (e.g., Clotfelter, Ladd & Vigdor 2005; Lankford, Loeb & Wyckoff 2002; Boyd et al. 2008). But questions remain as to whether value-added measures are a valid and appropriate tool for identifying and enhancing teacher effectiveness. In this report, the author aims to provide an accessible introduction to these new measures of teaching quality and puts them into the broader context of concerns over school quality and achievement gaps. Using New York City's Teacher Data Initiative and Houston's ASPIRE (Accelerating Student Progress, Increasing Results & Expectations) program as case studies, the author assesses the potential for these measures to improve outcomes in urban school systems. In doing so, he outlines some of the most important challenges facing value-added measures in practice. Appended are: (1) Race to the Top Definitions of Teacher Effectiveness and Student Achievement; (2) Sample New York City Teacher Data Report, 2010; and (3) Sample New York City Teacher Data Report, 2009. (Contains 10 figures and 30 footnotes.) [For "Can Teachers Be Evaluated by Their Students' Test Scores? Should They Be? The Use of Value-Added Measures of Teacher Effectiveness in Policy and Practice. Executive Summary. Education Policy for Action Series," see ED522164.]
Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University. Brown University Box 1985, Providence, RI 02912. Tel: 401-863-7990; Fax: 401-863-1290; e-mail: AISR_Info@brown.edu; Web site: http://www.annenberginstitute.org
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University
Identifiers - Location: New York; Texas
Identifiers - Laws, Policies, & Programs: Race to the Top