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ERIC Number: ED522028
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2006-Sep
Pages: 19
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 21
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
An Introductory Global Overview: The Private Fit to Salient Higher Education Tendencies. PROPHE Working Paper Series. WP No. 7
Levy, Daniel C.
Program for Research on Private Higher Education
Private higher education has surged in recent decades and now forms a major part of the world's total higher education. A fourth of total enrollment might be a reasonable guess, albeit a very rough one. Only Western Europe remains mostly marginal to the global trend. Whether new or continuing, contemporary private growth is notable, especially in developing regions. This working paper provides only an introductory, quite partial sketch of how private higher education tends to fit broader higher education patterns, particularly patterns of recent change. Since higher education, and even just private higher education, is very diverse and involves multiple tendencies, it would be far too simple to say merely that private higher education fits broad higher education tendencies. Yet we see reason to highlight private sector characteristics such as huge expansion, responses to rising student demand and changing economies, average smallness in institutional size, tuition dependence, commercial orientations, hierarchical governance, political order, and a certain global self-identification. On the other hand, comparatively limited on the private side are academic research, graduate education, full-time staff, government finance, and government control. (Contains 13 notes.)
Program for Research on Private Higher Education. ED344 School of Education, University at Albany, State University of New York, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222. Fax: 518-442-5084; e-mail: prophe@albany.edu; Web site: http://www.albany.edu/dept/eaps/prophe/
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Program for Research on Private Higher Education