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ERIC Number: ED521995
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 107
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1242-2788-7
ISSN: N/A
The Health Effects of Attending College for Latina Undergraduate Students and Their Families
Mount, Jill Katherine
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Washington
Background and objective. Latinos are the largest ethnic minority in the U.S. and by 2050 they are estimated to become one quarter of the population, yet only one in ten has a college degree. More Latino women (Latinas) are currently attending college than Latino men. To date research has focused on their experiences and where they obtain support at college. The purpose of this study was to explore how attending college affects the health of Latina undergraduate college students and their families. Design and methods. Using a focused ethnographic design, four focus groups were conducted with 34 Latina undergraduate students at a large university in the northwestern U.S. Students were asked to define the meaning of personal health and family health and how they believed attending college affected their health and their family's health. The focus group transcripts were imported into ATLAS-ti6 software for management and analysis. Results. The Latinas defined five components of personal health: being happy or mentally healthy, having a balance of physical and emotional health, eating right, having enough money to afford it if they became sick, and exercise. They described family health as having four dimensions: support, communication, being together, and being able to afford healthcare. They believed attending college both facilitated and provided barriers to being healthy and having healthy families. Conclusion. Attending college had positive and negative effects on the health of Latina undergraduate students and their families. Although the focus of this study on student and family health was unique, the findings were generally consistent with those of previous studies. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A