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ERIC Number: ED521710
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 185
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1242-7540-6
ISSN: N/A
The Relationship between Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy and Perceived Career Barriers in the Career Decision Making of Selected Community College Students
Kelly, Rosemary Ritter
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, North Carolina State University
This study explored the differences between career decision-making self-efficacy (CDMSE) and perceived career barriers of students enrolled in the applied technology program compared to those enrolled in a college transfer program at a southeastern urban community college. Participants in the ex-post facto cross-sectional survey included 787 full and part-time students at the community college. There were three research questions: (1) Are there differences in mean scores of CDMSE and perceived career barriers of applied technology and college transfer community college students pursuing associate degree, diploma or certificate programs by demographic characteristics (gender, ethnicity, age, first-generational, employment, full and part-time student status)? (2) What is the predictive value of these demographic variables on CDMSE and perceived career barriers of applied technology and college transfer community college students pursuing associate degree, diploma or certificate programs? (3) Is there a relationship between CDMSE and perceived career barriers of applied technology and college transfer community college students pursuing associate degree, diploma or certificate programs? The Career Decision Self-Efficacy-Short Form and Career Barriers Inventory-Revised were administered to participants and data were analyzed using two sample t-tests, ANOVA and multiple regression models. There were significant differences between applied technology and college transfer students in terms of perception of career barriers and career decision-making self-efficacy. The applied technology students, who tended to be older, had higher career decision-making self-efficacy scores than the college transfer students and that did not change across the other demographic variables (gender, etc). The college transfer students, who tended to be younger, had higher perception of career barriers scores, and this did not change across demographic variables. Future research using a qualitative method of the factors of CAMES and perception of career barriers of the older applied technology and younger college transfer student populations is recommended to gain more specific information regarding the demographics within these two groups. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Two Year Colleges
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A