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ERIC Number: ED521073
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011-Mar
Pages: 18
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Designing and Implementing Teacher Performance Management Systems: Pitfalls and Possibilities
Wiener, Ross; Jacobs, Ariel
Aspen Institute
As new performance-management-related policies go from idea to implementation, policy makers and education leaders will be called upon to flesh-out what are still broad principles in many areas. This represents a significant inflection point for the teaching profession and the management of public school systems. Early decisions will determine whether the new evaluations form the basis of a new, more productive way of working in public education, or yet another policy pronouncement with little impact on outcomes. In July 2010, a diverse group of stakeholders--senior leaders from districts, states, and the federal government; union leaders from both the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) and the National Education Association (NEA); technical assistance providers, social entrepreneurs, and scholars--gathered in Aspen, Colorado to work on these issues. The workshop focused on designing and implementing teacher performance management systems. The premise of the workshop was that evaluation systems are a means, not an end. To reinvent teacher evaluation in service of increasing teacher effectiveness, public school systems need to address an inter-dependent set of responsibilities. Responsibilities include: setting clear expectations and measures of performance; establishing structures and processes for conducting meaningful evaluations and acting on the information that is produced; developing a continuous-improvement process that gives developmental guidance to teachers and assesses the efficacy of that assistance; and implementing systemic reforms that refashion other aspects of the organization to support this work (e.g., data/IT, HR, curriculum and instruction). This paper provides a discussion of key themes and takeaways from the workshop. This primer is intended as a resource for state and district leaders who are tackling the teacher effectiveness agenda. Summer Workshop Participants are appended. (Contains 11 endnotes.)
Aspen Institute. 1 Dupont Circle NW Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036. Tel: 410-820-5433; Tel: 202-736-5800; Fax: 202-467-0790; e-mail: publications@aspeninstitute.org; Web site: http://www.aspeninstitute.org
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: Administrators; Policymakers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Aspen Institute