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ERIC Number: ED521010
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 234
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1242-7968-8
ISSN: N/A
African American Doctoral Students at For-Profit Colleges and Universities: A Critical Race Theory Exploration
Hall, Jodi
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, North Carolina State University
Many people regard the doctorate as the pinnacle of success. Despite the challenges of completing the terminal degree, the dream of earning the doctoral degree remains a goal for many every year. Understanding the phenomenon of African American student enrollment at for-profit colleges and universities (FPCUs) is necessary because many African Americans use these institutions as alternative degree sources. The purpose of this study was to explore how social and environmental factors shape the academic experiences of African American doctoral students at FPCUs. The research questions that guided this study are as follows: (1) What are the academic experiences of African American doctoral students enrolled at FPCUs? (2) What are the social experiences of African American doctoral students enrolled at FPCUs? (3) What enhances the success of African American doctoral students at FPCUs? (4) What impedes the success of African American doctoral students at FPCUs? Critical race theory provided the conceptual framework for exploring and analyzing narratives about the experiences of African American doctoral students at FPCUs. I collected data using a qualitative methodology that consisted of open-ended, semi questions in face-to-face interviews with twelve African American individuals who either completed doctoral degree at FPCUs or were currently enrolled at FPCUs. The findings revealed that the impact of race and racism were minimized by these African American doctoral students. The social context of the learning environment enhanced their potential for success. Four main conclusions of this study were that students experience fewer microaggressions in the online environment; the flexible admissions process attracts African American students; though African American doctoral students at FPCUs demonstrate perseverance and have high expectations, they face limited career opportunities; and African American doctoral students at FPCUs incur high debt to receive flexible admissions and scheduling. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A