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ERIC Number: ED520943
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 279
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1240-9530-1
ISSN: N/A
Student and Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Oral Communication Behavior in Algebra and Geometry Classrooms
Assuah, Charles K.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Nevada, Reno
Oral communication in mathematics classroom plays an essential role in the mathematics learning process, because it allows students to share ideas, refine their thoughts, reflect on their methods, and clarify their understanding (NCTM, 2000). Knowledge about teacher oral communication behaviors allows researchers and policy makers to identify and focus on relevant mathematics and science content areas which lack the needed attention, and address them by designing appropriate instructional methods to improve students' conceptual understanding through effective professional development programs (Cohen & Hill, 1998; Fennema, Carpenter, Franke, Jacobs, & Empson, 1996). This study examines students' and teachers' perceptions of teacher communication behaviors by investigating teacher oral communication behaviors in algebra and geometry classrooms by using modified versions of the Teacher Communication Behavior Questionnaire developed by She and Fisher (2000). The participants were high school algebra and geometry students and teachers in a school district of a Western State. The results indicate that the significant interaction effect between subject and ELL status means that the effect of ELL status is different in algebra than it is in geometry. The graph and analysis of simple main effects show that the ELL and non-ELL means do not differ in algebra, but do differ in geometry, where the non- ELL students have a higher TOTALTCBQ mean than do ELL students. Additionally, the significant interaction effect between subject and ELL status means that the effect of ELL status is different in algebra than it is in geometry. The graph and analysis of simple main effects again show that the ELL and non-ELL means do not differ in algebra, but do differ in geometry, where the non-ELL students have a higher ENCOURAGEMENT AND PRAISE mean than do ELL students. The main effect for ELL status indicates that non-ELL students perceived their teachers ask them more challenging questions than ELL students perceived their teachers. The main effect for participant type showed that teachers perceived that teachers encourage and praise students more than students perceived teachers encourage and praise students. The results of this study also demonstrate a variety of oral communication behaviors such as speaking loudly and clearly and repeating procedures and vocabularies that teachers can use to support all students, including ELLs, to improve their mathematical understanding. A broader implication of this study is that teachers will be able to identify appropriate instructional approaches in teaching these subjects and provide a strong foundation for students' conceptual understanding. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A