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ERIC Number: ED520560
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 162
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1241-6741-1
ISSN: N/A
Principals' Perceptions of Teacher Evaluation Practices in an Urban School District
Henry Barton, Shana N.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, University of the Pacific
Teacher evaluation has the ability to greatly support increased student achievement. However, existing literature on the topic finds evaluations are not meeting the intended purpose. Since principals are responsible for the implementation of the process at their school site, their perceptions of current processes is of value if evaluations are to be of value. Therefore, this study investigated K-12 principals' perceptions of teacher evaluation practices in an urban northern California school district. Data were collected through the administration of a survey. Of the 79 surveys distributed to school principals, 52 were completed and returned. Upon receiving the surveys, frequencies, percentages, means, and dependent sample t-tests were employed to analyze the data. The inductive analysis approach was used to code open-ended responses. The results illustrate that principals find formative and summative evaluation approaches are more effective for non-tenured teachers. However, they find the evaluation process is more supportive of tenured teachers when only formative approaches are applied. Principals find the process time intensive and lacking a clear purpose. Additional barriers ranged from teacher unions, to a lack of district support and inconsistency of implementation among principals. Principals seek reform in teacher evaluations where all parties find the process meaningful despite tenure status. Furthermore, principals seek a more comprehensive process that includes both formative and summative approaches. It is recommended that further research be conducted on the impact of time, school structures that support principals as coaches and evaluators, and how credentialing programs and districts provide training to principals in evaluation processes and barriers. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: California