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ERIC Number: ED520501
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 129
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1241-9611-4
ISSN: N/A
Practicing Independent Reading with Decodable Texts: A Comparison Study of Texts with Second Graders
Cheatham, Jennifer Pool
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Southern Methodist University
The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to investigate if students who read decodable books during independent reading time improved word reading and decoding skills more than students who read authentic literature during independent reading time but received the same instruction. The study was conducted for 10 weeks with 62 second-grade students, all of whom were being taught to read in English. Within classrooms, students were matched according to decoding ability and were randomly assigned to either a treatment group in which students read decodable books, or a contrast group in which students read authentic literature during 30 minutes of daily independent reading time. The Test of Word Reading Efficiency (Torgesen, Wagner, & Rashotte, 1999) Phonemic Decoding Efficiency subtest and Sight Word Efficiency subtest were used as pre-post measures. The Dynamic Indicator of Basic Early Literacy Skills (Good & Kaminski, 2002) Nonsense Word Fluency subtest and Oral Reading Fluency subtest were administered every two weeks to continuously monitor student progress. For statistical analyses, students were classified as either developing decoders or advanced decoders based on a proximal test of initial ability. Independent t tests of the pre-post data indicated no differences between the treatment and contrast groups on either subtest, but there was a moderate effect size of 0.67 in favor of the treatment group on the Sight Word Efficiency subtest for developing decoders. The Hierarchical Linear Modeling analysis indicated that both the treatment group and initial ability were statistically significant factors on the Nonsense Word Fluency subtest. The model of best fit for Oral Reading Fluency subtest was also the model which included both treatment group and initial ability as factors, but these factors were not statistically significant. The results indicated that the developing decoders who read decodable books during independent reading time improved word reading and decoding skills more than students who read authentic literature during independent reading time. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Education; Grade 2
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS)