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ERIC Number: ED520480
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 43
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 42
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Exploring the Effects of Social Networking on Students' Perceptions of Social Connectedness, Adjustment, Academic Engagement, and Institutional Commitment
Hansen, Michele J.; Childress, Janice E.; Trujillo, Daniel J.
Association for Institutional Research (NJ1), Paper presented at the Annual Forum of the Association for Institutional Research (50th, Chicago, IL, May 29-Jun 2, 2010)
Social networking is a tool being explored by many institutions as a means of connecting to and communicating with students. This study explores whether or not students' use of social networking services (SNSs) has significant effects on social connectedness, college adjustment, academic engagement, and institutional commitment. Students' use of SNSs did not have significant negative effects on academic performance or engagement. Results suggested that students' use of SNS with students has a strong positive effect on their feelings of Social Connectedness. However, students' use of SNSs with faculty or staff was negatively related to feelings of social connectedness, even when age, enrollment status, credits earned, and college GPA were accounted for. Students' use of SNS or Traditional Technologies (e.g., university e-mail or course-based system) with faculty or staff was significantly positively related to levels of Academic Engagement. Students prefer to use SNSs to establish social connections with friends and family rather than for academic purposes. (Contains 9 tables.)
Association for Institutional Research. 1435 East Piedmont Drive Suite 211, Tallahassee, FL 32308. Tel: 850-385-4155; Fax: 850-383-5180; e-mail: air@airweb.org; Web site: http://www.airweb.org
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Association for Institutional Research