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ERIC Number: ED519166
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 7
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
School Attendance: Focusing on Engagement and Re-Engagement. Practice Notes
Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA
Every student absence jeopardizes the ability of students to succeed at school and schools to achieve their mission. School attendance is a constant concern in schools. Average daily attendance rates are a common determiner of school funding, so schools funded on the basis of average daily attendance have less resources to do the job. Students who are not at school cannot receive instruction. Academic achievement scores are correlated with school attendance. Excessive school absence is a precursor of school dropout. Some youngsters who are truant from school engage in behaviors that are illegal. The negative correlates related to school attendance problems go on and on. Reducing school absences is one of the most challenging matters facing schools. Prevailing policies that simply mandate attendance and spell out increasingly harsh punishments for unexcused absences fail to take into account the range of underlying causes of attendance problems and the range of prevention, early intervention, and ongoing support that might more effectively address the problems. In addressing the problem, it is important to begin by exploring two questions: What factors lead to student absences? How can schools more effectively address the problem? These questions are addressed in a policy and practice analysis brief entitled: "School Attendance Problems: Are Current Policies & Practices Going in the Right Direction?" This paper excerpts from that report implications for intervention.
Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA. Department of Psychology, Franz Hall, 405 Hilgard Avenue, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563. Tel: 310-825-3634; Fax: 310-206-8716; e-mail: smhp@ucla.edu; Web site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: University of California, Los Angeles, Center for Mental Health in Schools