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ERIC Number: ED519121
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 10
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 17
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Dropout Prevention and Intervention Programs: Effects on School Completion and Dropout among School-Aged Children and Youth
Wilson, Sandra Jo; Tanner-Smith, Emily; Lipsey, Mark W.
Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness
The objective of this systematic review is to summarize the available evidence on the effects of prevention and intervention programs aimed at primary and secondary students for increasing school completion or reducing school dropout. Program effects on the closely related outcomes of school attendance (absences, truancy) will also be examined. Moreover, when accompanying dropout or attendance outcomes, effects on student engagement, academic performance, and school conduct are also included. The primary focus of the analyses presented here will be the comparative effectiveness of different programs and program approaches in an effort to identify those that have the largest and most reliable effects on the respective school participation outcomes, especially with regard to differences associated with treatment modality, implementation quality, and program location or setting. In addition, evidence of differential effects for students with different characteristics will be explored, e.g., in relation to age or grade, gender, race/ethnicity, and risk factors. The results of the regression analyses on the studies coded thus far find that unpublished research and higher quality methods produce significantly smaller treatment differences. Ethnic mix and grade level were not significantly associated with differential effects for treatment. Key program characteristics associated with less dropout among treated students included implementation quality, shorter duration programs, and community-based programs. When controlling for other influences on outcome (e.g., implementation), all program types produced positive results, though the mentoring and "other" programs fell short of significance. Attendance monitoring and incentives, child care, community service, and school restructuring programs produced best results. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)
Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness. 2040 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208. Tel: 202-495-0920; Fax: 202-640-4401; e-mail: inquiries@sree.org; Web site: http://www.sree.org
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: Administrators; Policymakers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness (SREE)