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ERIC Number: ED518525
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 189
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1241-0518-5
ISSN: N/A
Determinants of a Professor's Decision to Include Service-Learning in an Academic Course
Frolow, Miriam Lyons
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Seton Hall University
More faculty report each year that they are incorporating service-learning in their academic courses, which is often related to attempts by colleges and universities to link academics with service to the community as part of their mission, or by the academic disciplines that see service-learning as a way to link theory and practice. Critical to the expansion of service-learning is the recognition that it is the individual professor who ultimately decides whether or not to include a service-learning experience in the curriculum. The main purpose of this study is to determine the likelihood that faculty will use service-learning within their courses based on sociodemographic, academic and institutional characteristics, faculty workload issues, and the relationship between faculty and their institutions. By building upon the previous research studies, both on faculty in general and on faculty and service-learning, this study is a step toward a more comprehensive profile of faculty who have selected service-learning as a pedagogical option and faculty who have not. Determinants relating to workload, work preference, personal beliefs, and institutional cultural factors were found to be more significantly associated with faculty who did and did not use service-learning than the sociodemographic, academic and institutional characteristics. In fact, the three most significant and positive relationships were faculty who believed that many courses at their institutions involved community service, faculty who used other student-centered pedagogies, and faculty who participated in community or public service each week. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A