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ERIC Number: ED518466
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 242
Abstractor: As Provided
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1241-3417-8
ISSN: N/A
Deaf Community Mobilization in Uruguay
Lockwood, Elizabeth
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Illinois at Chicago, Health Sciences Center
There are more than 50 million (or approximately 15%) persons with disabilities living in Latin America and the Caribbean: 80 percent live in impoverished conditions, lack employment, and encounter social exclusion. Deaf and hard of hearing persons are particularly impacted as they are frequently denied access to most sectors of society. This includes limited availability of trained and qualified sign language interpreters, ineffective or under-enforced deaf-related legislation, inaccessible telecommunication services, the absence of bilingual education, inadequate employment opportunities, no official recognition of a distinct language and culture, and the widespread lack of knowledge and awareness of the situation of deaf and hard of hearing individuals. In contrast, the Deaf Uruguayan community has effectively mobilized to implement significant deaf-related programs, policies, and laws. This dissertation is a case study of the Deaf Uruguayan community in Montevideo. The research draws on an identity-based grassroots development and social movement framework to provide insight into the development and sustainability of this unique community. Qualitative data was gathered over a 12-month period through in-depth interviews with 14 community leaders and 12 community members, extensive participant observation, and document analysis. The findings of the research illustrate effective strategies of collective leadership, strong intra-group networks, Deaf and hearing alliances within and outside the community, the use of interpreters, accessible education, and media and technology. In addition, the research demonstrates a different path of community cohesion and integration into majority society structures. These strategies contribute to community empowerment and continued efforts in gaining achievements. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Uruguay