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ERIC Number: ED518381
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 5
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 3
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
How Need-Based Financial Aid Reduces College Attrition among Low-Income Public University Students: The Role of Time Use
Goldrick-Rab, Sara; Harris, Douglas N.; Benson, James
Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness
The authors examine whether a need-based financial grant distribution "at random" to 1,500 Wisconsin Pell Grant recipients attending 13 public universities had an impact on how they allocated their time devoted to (a) working, (b) studying, (c) sleeping, and (d) socializing. To test whether time use mediates the relationship between aid and college persistence, the authors also conduct a quasi-experimental inquiry into the effect of time use on attrition. Preliminary results indicate that while assignment to receive the Fund for Wisconsin Scholars (FFWS) grant did not change the amount of work university students, it did reduce the number of hours worked and altered the time of day students work. Specifically, students randomly assigned to receive the grant who worked in the last week reported working 1.66 fewer hours (the control group worked 15.09 hours, p=0.07). Students were less likely to work the "graveyard shift" between 2 am and 8 am if randomly assigned to receive the grant: 7.3 percent of the treatment group did so, compared to 12.0 percent of the control group (p=0.076). Among those who worked, those assigned to treatment were also 10.8 percentage points less likely to work between 8 am and 12 pm, which are popular starting times for classes (the control group worked those hours at a rate of 53.3%, p=0.015).
Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness. 2040 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208. Tel: 202-495-0920; Fax: 202-640-4401; e-mail: inquiries@sree.org; Web site: http://www.sree.org
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness (SREE)
Identifiers - Location: Wisconsin