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ERIC Number: ED517979
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010-Oct
Pages: 8
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Parent-Teacher Conference Tip Sheets for Principals, Teachers, and Parents
Harvard Family Research Project
A growing body of evidence suggests that family engagement matters for student success. Research shows that family engagement improves school readiness, student achievement, and social skills. Furthermore, an increasing number of innovative approaches to education leverage and connect the many settings and times in which children learn and grow to create seamless "complementary learning" systems that place families as core partners in the learning process. As this research base and local, state, and national policies and models converge in support of family engagement, there is a growing demand to provide practical tools that reflect the current state of the field. This set of parent-teacher conference tip sheets provides administrators, educators, and families with ideas and strategies that honor their shared responsibility in supporting family engagement. These three tip sheets--for principals, teachers, and parents--can help ensure that parent-teacher conferences achieve their maximum potential by providing guidance that reflects each person's role and responsibility in promoting productive home-school communication. Designed to be used as a set, the tip sheets combine consistent information with targeted suggestions, so that parents and educators enter into conferences with shared expectations and an increased ability to work together to improve children's educational outcomes.
Harvard Family Research Project. Harvard University, 3 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138. Tel: 617-495-9108; Fax: 617-495-8594; e-mail: hfrp@gse.harvard.edu; Web site: http://www.hfrp.org
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Parents; Teachers; Administrators
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Harvard Family Research Project