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ERIC Number: ED517319
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 97
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1097-6166-5
ISSN: N/A
The Effects of Summer Reading Programs on Low-Income English Language Learners' and Low-Income English L1s' Reading Achievement in Grades 2-4
Butler, Tammy Lynn
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Arkansas
Summer reading setback is a phenomenon that occurs over the summer break when students lose the skills they gained over the school year. While school-year gains are similar for disadvantaged and more-advantaged students, the achievement gap widens over the summer months. Lack of print access and less time spent reading result in greater summer reading setback for low-income students. This study measured the effectiveness of three summer programs on the reading achievement of disadvantaged English language learners (ELLs) and disadvantaged students who speak English as a first language (EL1s) in grades 2 through 4. The experimental groups included 1) students who received a weekly home visit and new books from the school staff, 2) students who took ten books home over the summer, and 3) a control group who was given a reading log. Reading achievement was measured using DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency and Oral Retelling subtests. Results from a two-way ANCOVA showed that both treatment groups made statistically greater gains over the control group in both Oral Reading Fluency and Oral Retelling. No significant differences were found between ELLs and EL1s when first language was controlled, suggesting first language was not a factor in the success of the program. The findings suggested that access to books not only stemmed summer reading setback, but increased reading achievement for disadvantaged ELLs and EL1s. Further research should replicate the current study with a larger sample size. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Education; Grade 2; Grade 3; Grade 4
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A