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ERIC Number: ED516958
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 158
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1240-1639-9
ISSN: N/A
Positive Perceptions: The Role of Academic and Social Self-Efficacies in the Transition from High School to Private Four-Year Colleges
Elliott, Diane Cardenas
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, New York University
This study was designed to investigate the influence of self-efficacy on the college persistence of students. More specifically, this study explored how pre-entry and second semester academic and social self efficacies affect the academic integration, social integration, and institutional retention of college students. In addition, this study explored if the relationship between self-efficacy and persistence varied as a function of institutional selectivity. Student persistence theories, Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior (1985), and Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory (1997) were used to theoretically ground this study. Regression results demonstrated that pre-entry academic and social self-efficacies significantly influenced academic and social integration, but did not directly influence institutional retention. Investigation of second semester self-efficacy perceptions and persistence resulted in a significant relationship with a differential impact based on institutional selectivity. Findings suggest institutions can bolster student persistence through interventions aimed at strengthening self-efficacy perceptions. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A