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ERIC Number: ED516768
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 191
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1240-1232-2
ISSN: N/A
Job Satisfaction of University Chief Student Conduct Administrators and Their Intent to Stay or Leave the Position
Nagel-Bennett, Suzie
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Western Michigan University
Chief student conduct administrators within higher education are responsible for administering and enforcing standards of student conduct, and navigating the vast legal, political and developmental components to fortify the ethical climate and academic integrity of institutions. Although some previous research regarding these individuals and their role does exist, no research to date could be found regarding their job satisfaction at four year public institutions in the United States. This study serves as the first research to examine overall job satisfaction, the level of satisfaction on stated intrinsic and extrinsic variables within the framework of Herzberg's (1966) dual-factor theory, and the intent of chief student conduct administrators to stay or leave their positions. A national on-line survey was sent to 358 members of the Association of Student Conduct Administrators, and 137(38%) completed the detailed survey. Results revealed that chief student conduct administrators were satisfied to some degree (86.4%) with their jobs. There were significant differences by gender in that male respondents were significantly more satisfied than females. Findings related to intrinsic variables showed that a majority of the variation in job satisfaction can be explained by the variables of responsibility, recognition, advancement, and work itself. Outcomes related to extrinsic variables showed much of the variation in job satisfaction can be explained by the variables of work conditions, personal life, job status, and relationship with colleagues. The majority of chief student conduct administrators intend to remain in their current positions for at least the next year. Further investigation revealed that advancement opportunities, when combined with age and gender, can be used to predict whether or not a chief student conduct administrator will stay or leave their position. Moreover, the extrinsic variable of balance of work and personal life, combined with age and gender, can also be used to predict whether or not a chief student conduct administrator will stay or leave their position. Overall, this research study offers an initial look at the role and job satisfaction of chief student conduct administrators at four year public institutions across the United States, and provides a foundation for future studies. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A