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ERIC Number: ED516628
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 212
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1097-7253-1
ISSN: N/A
How Improving Schools Allocate Resources: A Case Study of Successful Schools in One Southern California Urban School District
Morgan, Helen Emery
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, University of Southern California
The current fiscal climate in California and the country has had a tremendous impact on every facet of society. Education has experienced budget reductions that have impacted every aspect of serving students and their families. Research provides educators with evidence-based strategies that have shown to improve student achievement. This study focuses on a number of these strategies and the degree of implementation at three ethnically diverse, high poverty schools within a single school district. The study compares the resources available at these schools with those outlined in the Evidence-Based Model recommendations for funding schools. The stakeholders in this study identify successful research-based strategies and how the current fiscal crisis will impact further implementation of these practices. Included in this study is the district role in the decision making process and the support provided to the individual school sites. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: California