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ERIC Number: ED516413
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 138
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1240-1654-2
ISSN: N/A
Considering the Activity in Interactivity: A Multimodal Perspective
Schwartz, Ruth N.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, New York University
What factors contribute to effective multimedia learning? Increasingly, interactivity is considered a critical component that can foster learning in multimedia environments, including simulations and games. Although a number of recent studies investigate interactivity as a factor in the effective design of multimedia instruction, most examine only the broad question of whether interactivity is included or excluded. This study focuses on a more fine-grained exploration of how interactive elements can be designed to be most effective. Based on theoretical approaches to active learning, it investigates whether differences at the level of presentation and motor control influence the effectiveness of a computer presentation. How does the added modality of gesture contribute to what is heard and seen? Do the specific motor actions performed in using a computer simulation, for example dragging versus clicking, affect retention of the information presented? Participants were presented with a series of forty spoken phrases describing actions, such as "walk the dog." They were asked to listen to each phrase and, in addition, do one of the following: simply listen; look at a graphic; click on the graphic to see an animation of the phrase; click and drag the graphic to "perform" the action described in the phrase. They were subsequently asked to recall as many of the phrases as possible. It was hypothesized that the higher level of motor activity involved in clicking and dragging would result in the best recall performance. The observed data support the theoretical model. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
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Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A