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ERIC Number: ED516308
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 120
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1097-5079-9
ISSN: N/A
Attitudes, Perceptions, and Behavioral Intentions of Engineering Workers toward Web 2.0 Tools in the Workplace
Krause, Jaclyn A.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Walden University
As Web 2.0 tools and technologies increase in popularity in consumer markets, enterprises are seeking ways to take advantage of the rich social knowledge exchanges that these tools offer. The problem this study addresses is that it remains unknown whether employees perceive that these tools offer value to the organization and therefore will be likely to use them in the workplace setting. Attitudes, perceptions, and behavioral intentions of engineering workers toward the use of Web 2.0 tools and technologies in the workplace were examined. Using the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) as a framework, employees at two campuses within the continental US of a large engineering organization were surveyed. A quantitative correlation study design was used. A web based survey was deployed to collect data. Data were analyzed using both multiple regression and analysis of variance statistical techniques. A significant positive correlation was found between performance expectancy, effort expectancy, and behavioral intention when previous experience with the tools was found. However, no correlation was found between occupational discipline and behavioral intention to use the technology. Additional findings indicate that these employees had little previous experience with these tools, believed that the tools were not important in the workplace, and had a low intention to use them within the next 12 months. These attitudes and intentions may be barriers to a successful implementation of Web 2.0 within organizations. Awareness of these barriers provides opportunities for positive change in existing processes, policies, and directives that allow for improved system implementation. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: United States