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ERIC Number: ED515141
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010-Feb
Pages: 16
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 58
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Persistent Fear and Anxiety Can Affect Young Children's Learning and Development. Working Paper #9
National Scientific Council on the Developing Child
Ensuring that young children have safe, secure environments in which to grow, learn, and develop healthy brains and bodies is not only good for the children themselves but also builds a strong foundation for a thriving, prosperous society. Science shows that early exposure to circumstances that produce persistent fear and chronic anxiety can have lifelong consequences by disrupting the developing architecture of the brain. Unfortunately, many young children are exposed to such circumstances. This report summarizes in clear language why, while some of these experiences are one-time events and others may reoccur or persist over time, all of them have the potential to affect how children learn, solve problems, and relate to others. [This report was sponsored by The Norlien Foundation.]
National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. Available from: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. 50 Church Street 4th Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138. Tel: 617-496-0578; Fax: 617-496-1229; e-mail: developingchild@harvard.edu; Web site: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/initiatives/council/
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Birth to Five Policy Alliance; Buffett Early Childhood Fund
Authoring Institution: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child