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ERIC Number: ED514493
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010-Jun
Pages: 54
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 59
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Teacher Attitudes about Compensation Reform: Implications for Reform Implementation. Working Paper 50
Goldhaber, Dan; DeArmond, Michael; DeBurgomaster, Scott
National Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research
Reform advocates and policymakers concerned about the quality and distribution of teachers support proposals of alternative compensation for teachers in hard-to-hire subject areas, hard-to-staff schools, and with special knowledge and skills. The successful implementation of such proposals depends in large part on teacher attitudes. The current body of research on teacher attitudes toward compensation reform paints an inconsistent picture of teachers' views, largely ignoring the influence of individual and workplace characteristics on teacher attitudes. Results from a 2006 survey of teachers in Washington State linked to school and district data confirm earlier findings that teacher opinion about pay reform is not uniform, and further illustrates teacher preferences for different pay structures vary substantially by individual and workplace characteristics. Nearly three quarters of teachers favored higher pay for hard-to-staff schools. In contrast, only 17% favored merit pay. Teachers with a high degree of confidence in their principal were more likely to support merit pay than those with greater sense of trust and respect for their fellow teachers than for their principal. Policymakers interested in implementing new pay systems should carefully assess teacher opinion in determining where (and how) they invest in them. Appendices include: (1) Descriptive Statistics; (2) Administrative Data, Survey Design, and Response Rates; and (3) Variable Coding. (Contains 6 tables and 27 footnotes.)
National Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research. The Urban Institute, 2100 M Street NW, Washington, DC 20037. Tel: 202-261-5739; Fax: 202-833-2477; e-mail: inquiry@caldercenter.org; Web site: http://www.caldercenter.org
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Urban Institute, National Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research (CALDER)
Identifiers - Location: Washington
IES Funded: Yes
Grant or Contract Numbers: R305A060067