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ERIC Number: ED514259
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 267
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1097-1163-9
ISSN: N/A
Classroom Management Strategies and Behavioral Interventions to Support Academic Achievement
Gilpatrick, Robin Sue Holzworth
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Walden University
This mixed method project study identified the need for effective classroom management strategies to dissuade student noncompliant behavior and to ensure academic success for all students. Enhancing classroom management practices is vital to improved student achievement and teacher self-efficacy. Within a constructivist framework, it is critical that teachers are adequately prepared and their professional needs are met, such that all students are taught well in classrooms that reflect high expectations. The purpose of this study was to understand how classroom teachers in grades 3 through 6, within a local school district experienced disruptive student behavior. The research question investigated teachers' perspectives of their behavior management strategies and the resulting effect on the student noncompliance that interferes with teaching and learning. Twenty-two teachers at 2 local schools responded to a survey in the quantitative phase of this sequential study. The qualitative phases, reflective of a phenomenological approach, captured the lived experiences of 9 teachers. Member checking afforded clarification. Themes emerged from the codified and compared data. The findings revealed the need for proactive classroom management practices that address noncompliant behaviors. As a result, the project design, a desktop manual of research-based classroom management strategies was developed to help teachers sustain learning environments that promote equity for all students. The implications for social change include the development of constructivist leadership principles. School districts, committed to change may prompt teachers, aided by the desktop manual, to manage disruptive student behaviors successfully, resulting in improved academic outcomes and heightened teacher self-efficacy that could influence society beyond the immediate educational venues. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education; Grade 3; Grade 4; Grade 5; Grade 6
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A