NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED513873
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2006
Pages: 64
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 47
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
How to Assess Student Performance in History: Going beyond Multiple-Choice Tests
Edmunds, Julie
SERVE Center at University of North Carolina at Greensboro
This paper addresses some real assessment challenges that teachers have identified: (1) Figuring out what really is important for students to know and be able to do in history; (2) Teaching the skills of "doing history" in a world of testing that often seems to value only factual knowledge; (3) Identifying and using assessments that provide teachers with better information than only multiple-choice exams; (4) Getting students motivated to do a good job on essays and other written work; (5) Helping students learn to improve their own work and produce quality products; and (6) Holding students accountable for quality work as opposed to just turning in something. It is designed to get you ready to meet those challenges by helping you: (1) Understand the role of assessment in improving student learning; (2) Consider different learning outcomes for students in history and pick those that are most important for your students; (3) Determine some of the best ways of assessing student learning and tracking and evaluating their progress toward history outcomes; (4) Develop methods of scoring and grading students' work that will provide information and accountability; and (5) Integrate your assessment program with the statewide testing programs currently in place. (Contains 16 figures and 2 footnotes.)
SERVE Center at University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 5900 Summit Avenue Suite 201, Browns Summit, NC 27214. Tel: 800-755-3277; Tel: 336-315-7400; Fax: 336-315-7457; Web site: http://www.serve.org
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Teacher; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: Teachers
Language: English
Sponsor: Institute of Education Sciences (ED)
Authoring Institution: SERVE Center at University of North Carolina at Greensboro