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ERIC Number: ED513536
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010-Mar-12
Pages: 40
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Market- and Performance-Based Reforms of Teacher Compensation: A Review of Recent Practices, Policies, and Research. Program on Education Policy and Governance Working Papers Series. PEPG 10-09
Podgursky, Michael J.; Springer, Matthew
Program on Education Policy and Governance, Harvard University, Prepared for the PEPG Conference "Merit Pay: Will It Work? Is It Politically Viable?" (Harvard Kennedy School, Cambridge, MA, Jun 3-4, 2010)
This paper provides a review of recent policy initiatives to reform teacher compensation systems and evidence regarding the effect of these policies. The first section examines the current structure of teacher compensation in the U.S. K-12 public education system. The compensation "system" for teachers is fragmented and uncoordinated. Teacher compensation is largely set by salary schedules that are neither market-oriented nor performance-driven. The second section reviews pay reforms being implemented in U.S. public school districts. The third section of the paper examines the small but growing evaluation literature on compensation reform, paying particular attention to evidence from studies using experimental and quasi-experimental designs to assess the impact of the program on student achievement and teacher outcomes. A final section provides observations on prospects for future reform, and suggestions for policy research. (Contains 6 tables and 10 footnotes.)
Program on Education Policy and Governance. Harvard University, Kennedy School of Government, 79 John F. Kennedy Street, Taubman 304, Cambridge, MA 02138. Tel: 617-495-7976; Fax: 617-496-4428; e-mail: pepg@fas.harvard.edu; Web site: http://www.hks.harvard.edu/pepg
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Reports - Evaluative; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Vanderbilt University, National Center on Performance Incentives; Urban Institute, National Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research (CALDER)
Authoring Institution: Harvard University, Program on Education Policy and Governance