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ERIC Number: ED513416
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 409
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1096-2973-6
ISSN: N/A
A Case Study of the Historically Successful Roles of African American Teachers in Contemporary, Selected, Urban Charter Schools in New York
Benson, Shanelle R.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, University of La Verne
Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine, to what degree, African American teachers in five selected, urban charter schools in New York performed the historical roles of counselor, advocate, disciplinarian, surrogate parent, and role model in, to determine how African American Teachers perceived the importance of performing the historical roles of counselor, advocate, disciplinarian, surrogate parent, and role model and lastly, to determine, to what degree, African American Teachers perceived the historical roles of counselor, advocate, disciplinarian, surrogate parent, and role model contributed to student success as evidenced by: standardized test scores, attendance, enrollment in constructive social activities (clubs, sports, community efforts, tutoring, and social activities), selection of advanced classes, GPA and matriculation to college. Methodology. This was an ethnographic case study of five selected, urban, charter schools in New York State. Quantitative data were collected from 89 African American teachers through a literature-based survey of behaviors associated with the five traditional roles. Qualitative data were collected through face-to face interviews and archival data. Findings. An examination of quantitative and qualitative data indicated the historical roles of African American teachers in selected, urban charter schools were essential to student academic and non academic success. Finding (1). African American teachers in selected, urban charter schools performed the roles of: the counselor by handling emotional situations with cultural sensitivity and knowledge, the advocate by being seen as leaders in the community, the disciplinarian by having a culturally sensitive understanding of acceptable/unacceptable behaviors, the surrogate parent by celebrating and joining in the vitality of African American children, and the role model by having special influence as a living example of professional success. Finding (2). African American teachers in selected, urban charter schools believed all the historical roles are important. Finding (3). The findings revealed the participants in the research project believed being sympathetic and culturally/socially aware and empowered, embracing blackness and learning from it, nurturing the whole child by providing love and affection, being real life examples of academic success, and embracing their community and making a difference by "uplifting" were important for performing the historical roles of counselor, advocate, disciplinarian, surrogate parent, and role model in five selected, urban charter schools in New York. Finding (4). African American teacher in selected, urban charter school believed the historical roles of teachers as counselor, advocate, disciplinarian, parent surrogate and role model contributed to students' academic and non academic success because the overall data from the four schools in the case study revealed 20% of the students participated in social activities (band, chorus, etc.), 45% of the students engaged in community efforts, 23% of the students enrolled in advance classes (AP), 52%, of the students had a GPA of 3.0 or higher, 83% of the 99 seniors matriculated to college, 31% of the students participated in on-campus clubs (debate, technology, Greek Clubs, etc.), 30% of the students engaged in extra curricular activities (sports and cheerleading), 84% of the students enrolled in tutoring. Recommendations. The following were recommendations for future studies: Recommendation (1). Further research is needed to identify the historical roles of Latin American teachers educating Latin American students. Recommendation (2). It is recommended that this study be replicated with a larger sample that includes traditional public school settings from across the nation. Recommendation (3). Further research is needed to determine if the same results from this study will occur in public schools with a larger numbers of students. Recommendation (4). Based on the findings; research is advised to determine if non African American teachers have the same influence with African American student when utilizing the historical roles of African American teachers. Conclusion. The study finds African American teacher in selected, urban charter schools successfully performed the roles of historical African American teaches. These findings were supported by student's commitment to; self empowerment, academics, and the surrounding communities. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: High Schools
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: New York