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ERIC Number: ED513255
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2009
Pages: 120
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1092-5572-0
ISSN: N/A
The Effects of the System of Least Prompts on Teaching Comprehension Skills during a Shared Story to Students with Significant Intellectual Disabilities
Mims, Pamela Joanne
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte
The development of literacy skills is a crucial skill that all students are entitled to develop (Browder, Gibbs, Ahlgrim-Delzell, Courtade, Mraz, Flowers, in press). Currently limited research has been conducted on the acquisition of early literacy skills for students with significant disabilities (Browder, Mims, Spooner, Ahlgrim-Delzell, & Lee, 2008; Browder, Trela, & Jimenez, 2007; Zakas, Browder, & Spooner, 2009) and even more limited on the acquisition of text dependent comprehension (Mims, Browder, Baker, Lee, & Spooner, in press). The current study examined the effects of the system of least prompts to teach multiple types of text dependent listening comprehension question during a shared story to students with significant intellectual disabilities. In addition, maintenance, generalization, and social validity were also examined. A teacher and two paraprofessionals were trained to implement a prompt hierarchy involving three levels (reread, model, physical) during three different shared stories with four different students. Results indicated that all four students increased the number of correctly answered comprehension questions during all three shared stories. In addition, students were able to maintain comprehension after a two week maintenance period. One student was able to generalize the skills used to develop comprehension during a shared story to the third book as well as an additional book. Finally, the interventionists reported high levels of satisfaction with the teaching strategy as well as student outcomes. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A