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ERIC Number: ED505859
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2004-Mar
Pages: 16
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Digital Leadership Divide
Consortium for School Networking (NJ1)
This 2004 survey from the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) and Grunwald Associates includes data from 455 school district decision-makers for technology. The report points to large and growing disparities in funding for school technology and questions if these differences signal a growing digital divide. The survey reveals, schools are making excellent use of technology for administrative purposes, deploying networks and systems to become more efficient and productive. Where schools seem to lag, though, is in integrating technology into the classroom to improve teaching and learning. However, school leaders--especially those whose districts already use technology the most--seem poised for technology to take education to this next level of reengineering the classroom experience to meet 21st century expectations. This is a window of opportunity for schools. Professional development is seen as the key to transforming teaching and learning, school leaders affirmed in the survey, as well as to using the data captured by technology to make better educational decisions. The good news is that school budgets may not be the biggest barrier to implementing comprehensive professional development. Instead, visionary leadership and community and parental support and seem to drive change in the most technology-intensive schools. All schools can use the lessons learned from high-tech districts to build public support and participation in technology decision-making. The survey findings led to recommending these approaches for schools to improve their use of technology to benefit students, teachers and administrators: (1) Move from automating administrative practices to transforming teaching and learning; (2) Invest in technology leadership; (3) Create new professional development initiatives; and (4) Recruit the active support of parents and the community. [Additional support provided by AT&T and Microsoft.]
Consortium for School Networking. 1710 Rhode Island Avenue NW Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036. Tel: 202-861-2676; Fax: 202-861-0888; e-mail: info@cosn.org; Web site: http://www.cosn.org
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Educational Testing Service
Authoring Institution: Consortium for School Networking