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ERIC Number: ED505156
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2009-May
Pages: 81
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 2
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Crime, Violence, Discipline, and Safety in U.S. Public Schools. Findings from the School Survey on Crime and Safety: 2007-08. First Look. NCES 2009-326
Neiman, Samantha; DeVoe, Jill F.
National Center for Education Statistics
This report presents findings on crime and violence in U.S. public schools, using data from the 2007-08 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS:2008). SSOCS provides information about school crime-related topics from the perspective of schools by asking school principals about the frequency of incidents, such as physical attacks, robberies, and thefts, in their schools. Tables in the report contain totals and percentages generated from bivariate cross-tabulation procedures. Many of the variables examined are related to one another, and complex interactions and relationships have not been explored. Reported findings include: (1) During the 2007-08 school year, the rate of violent incidents per 1,000 students was higher in middle schools than in primary schools or high schools; (2) Nine percent of schools reported at least one incident of threat with a weapon; (3) Rate of the distribution, possession, or use of illegal drugs was higher in schools with 1,000 or more students than in schools with lower enrollments; (4) About 13 percent of city schools reported at least one gang crime; (5) About 18 percent of city schools reported that student acts of disrespect for teachers (other than verbal abuse) happen daily or at least once a week; (6) For students involved in the use or possession of a weapon other than a firearm or explosive device at school, the most frequently used disciplinary action was an out-of-school suspension; (7) A lower percentage of schools with 1,000 or more students reported that more than 75 percent of students had a parent or guardian who attended regularly scheduled parent-teacher conferences than did schools with lower enrollments; (8) A higher percentage of schools with minority enrollments of 50 percent or more involved students in resolving student conduct problems as a component of violence prevention programs than did schools with lower minority enrollments; (9) Compared to schools in towns or rural areas, larger percentages of city and suburban schools reported having a written plan for procedures to be followed if the Department of Homeland Security issues a warning for a severe risk of terrorist attack; (10) A higher percentage of middle schools reported drilling students on a written plan describing the procedures to be performed during a shooting than high schools or primary schools; and (11) Among factors that were reported to limit schools' efforts to reduce or prevent crime, lack of or inadequate alternative placements or programs for disruptive students, inadequate funds, and federal/state/district policies on disciplining special education students are most frequently reported. Four appendixes are included: (1) Standard Error Tables; (2) Methodology and Technical Notes; (3) Description of Variables; and (4) 2007-08 School Survey on Crime and Safety Questionnaire. (Contains 18 footnotes and 23 tables.) [For "Crime, Violence, Discipline, and Safety in U.S. Public Schools. Findings from the School Survey on Crime and Safety: 2005-06. NCES 2007-361," see ED498378.]
National Center for Education Statistics. Available from: ED Pubs. P.O. Box 1398, Jessup, MD 20794-1398. Tel: 877-433-7827; Web site: http://nces.ed.gov/help/orderinfo.asp
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Evaluative; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (ED)
Authoring Institution: National Center for Education Statistics (ED)
IES Funded: Yes
IES Cited: ED565615