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ERIC Number: ED504340
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2008-Dec
Pages: 204
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 114
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Faculty Perceptions of Students with Intellectual Disabilities in Public Post Secondary Education
Fisher, Andrew
Online Submission, Ed.D. Dissertation, Texas A&M University-Commerce
Persons with intellectual disabilities have been integrated into post secondary education at increasing rates since the 1990s. Some colleges and universities have responded to the influx of this population by implementing specific programs designed to meet the needs of students who have intellectual disabilities. As many as 138 college campuses now have such programs. Because of the links between faculty perceptions and student success, discovering faculty perceptions and providing a context for those perceptions marked the purpose of this study. Qualitative and quantitative methods were employed to investigate faculty perceptions of students with intellectual disabilities when public post secondary campuses had programs designed for students with intellectual disabilities were compared to those institutions that did not have such programs. Findings were reported as an extension of data collected through an online survey research instrument completed by 246 faculty members from public post secondary campuses in the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools geographical area of accreditation. Data was analyzed using an ex post facto research design formulated from both quantitative answers subjected to nonparametric statistical analysis and qualitative responses analyzed through a constant comparative method. Faculty perceptions about the integration of students with intellectual disabilities into public post secondary campuses were favorable as indicated by a 71.2% acceptance rate. Results from this study showed no significant evidence of difference among faculty perceptions when compared between institutions that had and those that did not have programs designed for students with intellectual disabilities. Further, there was no difference in the type or amount of contact faculty members had with students who have intellectual disabilities when compared among institutions that did and those that did not have programs for students with intellectual disabilities. Neither did faculty members participate in more faculty development when such programs existed on their campuses. Hence, the presence of programs alone did not affect faculty perceptions of students who have intellectual disabilities. The following are appended: (1) First Email Correspondence with Potential Faculty Participants; (2) Second Email Correspondence with Potential Faculty Participants; (3) Survey; (4) Third Email Correspondence with Potential Faculty Participants; (5) Third Email Correspondence with Potential Faculty Participants who Participated in the Study But Who Did Not Get the First Emailed Thank You; and (6) Selected Faculty Responses from Qualitative Questions. (Contains 9 tables and 2 figures.)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A