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ERIC Number: ED504193
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2009-Feb
Pages: 55
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 4
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
After-School Programs in Public Elementary Schools: First Look. NCES 2009-043
Parsad, Basmat; Lewis, Laurie
National Center for Education Statistics
How school-age children spend their time after school is a topic of interest among educators, policymakers, researchers, and parents. Many parents choose to have their children attend after-school programs, which may provide services such as academic instruction, cultural enrichment, safe places to stay, and adult supervision for children. This study provides a national profile of various types of formal after-school programs physically located at public elementary schools in 2008. Examples of formal after-school programs include extended day care programs, academic instruction/tutoring programs, and 21st Century Community Learning Centers and exclude clubs or activities that are offered as school-sponsored extra curricular activity. In this report, stand-alone programs refer to after-school programs that focus primarily on a single type of service while broad-based programs refer to after-school programs that provide a combination of services. After-school programs are further categorized into four types: (1) Fee-based stand-alone day care programs; (2) Stand-alone academic instruction/tutoring programs; (3) The 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLCs); and (4) Other types of formal stand-alone or broad-based after-school programs. The National Center for Education Statistics in the Institute of Education Sciences conducted the survey in spring 2008 using the Fast Response Survey System (FRSS), a survey system designed to collect small amounts of issue-oriented data from a nationally representative sample of schools, with minimal burden on respondents and within a relatively short period of time. Questionnaires were mailed to approximately 1,800 public elementary schools in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Data were adjusted for non-response and weighted to yield national estimates that represent all public elementary schools in the United States. The purpose of this report is to introduce new NCES data through the presentation of tables containing descriptive information: selected findings have been chosen to demonstrate the range of information available from the FRSS study rather than to discuss all of the observed differences. Findings are based on self-reported data from public elementary schools. All specific statements of comparisons made have been tested for statistical significance at the .05 level using Student t-statistics to ensure that the differences are larger than those that might be expected due to sampling variation. Adjustments for multiple comparisons were not included. Many of the variables examined are related to one another, and complex interactions and relationships have not been explored. Selected reported findings include: (1) Of the estimated 49,700 public elementary schools in the nation, 56 percent reported that one or more after-school programs were physically located at the school in 2008; (2) Forty-six percent of all public elementary schools reported a fee-based stand-alone day care program, 43 percent reported one or more stand-alone academic instruction/tutoring programs, and 10 percent reported a 21st CCLC; (3) One-tenth of public elementary schools indicated that they provided Supplemental Educational Services (SES); (4) Eighteen percent of all public elementary schools reported one formal after-school program, 23 percent reported two programs, 14 percent reported three or more programs, and 44 percent indicated that no formal after-school programs were located at the school; (5) Public elementary schools reported an estimated 4 million enrollments in formal after-school programs at public elementary schools; (6) Forty-one percent of public elementary schools with 21st CCLCs reported that their 21st CCLC provided transportation home for students, 37 percent of the schools with stand-alone academic instruction/tutoring programs reported providing transportation home; 4 percent of the schools with fee-based stand-alone day care reported providing transportation home; and 24 percent with other types of after-school programs indicated that the school provided transportation home for students; and (7) Forty-six percent of public elementary schools reported that their students attended fee-based standalone day care at another location, 22 percent reported that students attended stand-alone academic instruction/tutoring programs, 3 percent reported that students attended 21st CCLCs, and 8 percent reported that students attended other types of formal after-school programs at another location. Three appendices include: (1) Standard Error Tables; (2) Technical Notes; and (3) Questionnaire. (Contains 3 footnotes and 22 tables.)
National Center for Education Statistics. Available from: ED Pubs. P.O. Box 1398, Jessup, MD 20794-1398. Tel: 877-433-7827; Web site: http://nces.ed.gov/help/orderinfo.asp
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Descriptive; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: Elementary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Center for Education Statistics (ED)
Identifiers - Location: District of Columbia; United States
IES Funded: Yes