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ERIC Number: ED503000
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2008-Oct
Pages: 58
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 9
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Student Victimization in U.S. Schools: Results from the 2005 School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey. NCES 2009-306
Bauer, Lynn; Guerino, Paul; Nolle, Kacey Lee; Tang, Sze-Wei
National Center for Education Statistics
This report provides estimates of student victimization as defined by the 2005 School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the 2005 National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). the nation's primary source of information on crime victimization and the victims of crime in the United States. SCS is a supplement to NCVS that was created to collect information about school-related victimization on a national level, and was conducted in 1989, 1995, 1999, 2001, 2003, and 2005. The report presents five sections of results. The first two sections discuss the prevalence and type of student victimization at school and selected characteristics of victims, including their demographic characteristics and school type. The third section explores victim and nonvictim reports of conditions of an unfavorable school climate, such as the presence of gangs and weapons and the availability of drugs. The fourth section examines victimization and student reports of security measures taken at school to secure school buildings and the use of personnel and enforcement of administrative procedures at school to ensure student safety. The fifth section examines fear and avoidance behaviors of victims and nonvictims, such as skipping class or avoiding specific places at school. SCS is cross-sectional and nonexperimental. Further, certain characteristics discussed in this report may be related to one another, but this analysis does not control for such possible relationships. Therefore, no causal inferences should be made between school or student characteristics and victimization when reading these results. Selected major findings from the 2005 NCVS and SCS include: (1) Four percent of students ages 12 through 18 reported that they were victims of any crime at school, and one percent of students reported being victims of violent crime at school; (3) The percentage of males who reported being victims of a violent crime at school was higher than the percentage of females; (4) Of the students who reported they were victims of a violent crime at school, the percentage of 6th-grade and 7th-grade students was higher than the percentage of 10th-grade students; (5) Of those students who reported being victims of violent crime, a higher percentage mostly C's than students who reported receiving mostly A's or B's; (6) Three percent of students who attended public schools reported being victims of theft, compared to 1 percent of students who attended private schools; (7) Forty-one percent of student victims of any crime reported the presence of gangs at school compared to 23 percent of students who were not victims; (9) Fifty percent of student victims of theft and 51 percent of student victims of violent crime said drugs were available at their schools, compared to 34 percent of students who were not victims; (8) A higher percentage of students who reported being victims of theft reported that their schools used security guards or assigned police officers compared to nonvictims of any crime; (9) The percentage of student victims of theft and violent crimes who reported being afraid of attack or harm at school was higher than nonvictims of any crime; and (10) A higher percentage of students reporting violent crime reported avoiding specific places at school and avoiding extracurricular activities because of fear of attack or harm than nonvictims of any crime. The U.S. public continues to be concerned about crime in school and the safety of students, as well as how victimization at school may be an impediment to student success. Crime in schools can have negative implications not only for those directly involved in the incident but also for other students, faculty, and staff, and create an environment that is unfavorable for successful educational attainment. Findings presented in this report aid in identifying the scope of victimization at school, environmental conditions that may be associated with it, and its ramifications. These findings can help educators, policymakers, administrators, and parents understand the extent of student victimization in order to develop policies that better address issues of school crime and violence. Five appendixes are included: (1) Technical Notes; (2) Estimate Tables; (3) Standard Error tables; (4) 2005 School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) Instrument; and (5) Selected Items from the National Crime Victimization Survey Crime Incident Report (NCVS-2). (Contains 13 footnotes, 5 figures and 14 tables.)
National Center for Education Statistics. Available from: ED Pubs. P.O. Box 1398, Jessup, MD 20794-1398. Tel: 877-433-7827; Web site: http://nces.ed.gov/help/orderinfo.asp
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Research; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education; Grade 10; Grade 11; Grade 12; Grade 6; Grade 7; Grade 8; Grade 9
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Center for Education Statistics (ED)
IES Funded: Yes
IES Cited: ED509900