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ERIC Number: ED502147
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2008-Jul
Pages: 22
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 23
ISBN: ISBN-978-0-8406-0623-5
ISSN: N/A
Diagnosed Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Learning Disability: United States, 2004-2006. Data from the National Health Interview Survey. Vital and Health Statistics. Series 10, Number 237
Pastor, Patricia N.; Reuben, Cynthia A.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Objectives: This report presents national estimates of the prevalence of diagnosed attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and learning disability (LD) in U.S. children 6-17 years of age and describes the prevalence of these conditions for children with selected characteristics. The use of educational and health care services and the prevalence of other health conditions are contrasted for children with ADHD without LD, LD without ADHD, both conditions, and neither condition. Methods: Estimates are based on data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), an ongoing national household survey of the civilian non-institutionalized population of the United States. The analysis focuses on 23,051 children 6-17 years of age in the child sample of the 2004, 2005, and 2006 NHIS. Results: About 5% of children had ADHD without LD, 5% had LD without ADHD, and 4% had both conditions. Boys were more likely than girls to have each of the diagnoses (ADHD without LD, LD without ADHD, and both conditions). Children 12-17 years of age were more likely than children 6-11 years of age to have each of the diagnoses. Hispanic children were less likely than non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black children to have ADHD (with and without LD). Children with Medicaid coverage were more likely than uninsured children and privately insured children to have each of the diagnoses. Children with each of the diagnoses were more likely than children with neither ADHD nor LD to have other health conditions. Children with ADHD were more likely than children without ADHD to have contact with a mental health professional, use prescription medication, and have frequent health care visits. Children with LD were more likely than children without LD to use special education services. (Contains 9 figures and 4 tables.)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30333. Tel: 800-311-3435; Tel: 404-639-3311; Web site: http://www.cdc.gov
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Teachers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Center for Health Statistics (DHHS/PHS)