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ERIC Number: ED497845
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2007-Aug
Pages: 196
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 56
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Problem Solving in Technology-Rich Environments. A Report from the NAEP Technology-Based Assessment Project, Research and Development Series. NCES 2007-466
Bennett, Randy Elliot; Persky, Hilary; Weiss, Andrew R.; Jenkins, Frank
National Center for Education Statistics
The Problem Solving in Technology-Rich Environments (TRE) study was designed to demonstrate and explore innovative use of computers for developing, administering, scoring, and analyzing the results of National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) assessments. Two scenarios (Search and Simulation) were created for measuring problem solving with technology and administered to nationally representative samples of students. Resultant data were used to describe the measurement characteristics of the scenarios and student performance. The Search scenario required students to locate and synthesize information from a simulated World Wide Web environment. The Simulation scenario required students to experiment to solve problems of increasing complexity. TRE Search consisted of 11 observables and produced a total score and two subscores: scientific inquiry and computer skills. Findings of the Search scenario include: (1) Internal consistency of the three TRE Search scores (total, scientific inquiry, and computer skills) ranged from 0.65 to 0.74; (2) Search scores provided overlapping but not redundant information; (3) Scientific inquiry skill scale score was most related to the relevance of the World Wide Web pages visited or bookmarked, the quality of the constructed response to a question designed to motivate students to search for and synthesize information from the Web, and the degree of use of relevant search terms; (4) The computer skills scale score was related primarily to the use of hyperlinks, the use of the Back button, the number of searches needed to get relevant hits, and the use of bookmarking; and (5) Statistically significant differences in performance were found on one or more TRE Search scales for NAEP reporting groups categorized by race/ethnicity, parents' highest education level, student eligibility for free or reduced-price school lunch, and school location, but not for reporting groups categorized by gender. The TRE Simulation scenario consisted of 28 observables and produced a total score and three subscores: scientific exploration, scientific synthesis, and computer skills. Findings of the Simulation scenario include: (1) Internal consistency of the four scales ranged from 0.73 to 0.89; (2) Simulation scores provided overlapping but not redundant information; (3) Scientific exploration skill scale score was most related to which experiments students chose to solve the Simulation problems; (4) Scientific synthesis scale was primarily related to the degree of correctness and completeness of conclusions drawn for each problem; (5) Performance on the computer skills scale was related mainly to the number of characters in the written responses students gave for each of the Simulation problems; and (6) Statistically significant differences in performance were found on one or more TRE Simulation scales for NAEP reporting groups categorized by race/ethnicity, parents' highest education level, and student eligibility for free or reduced-price school lunch, but not for reporting groups categorized by gender or school location. It is noted that this report presents results that do not reach definitive conclusions at this point in time and techniques and inferences made from the data may be subject to future revision. Appendixes include: (A) Development Committee for the Problem Solving in Technology-Rich Environments (TRE) Study; (B) Sample Selection; (C) Technical Specifications for Participating Schools; (D) Prior Knowledge and Background Questions for Search and Simulation Scenarios; (E) TRE Simulation Glossary, Help and Tutorial Screens; (F) Bayesian Estimation in the Problem Solving in Technology-Rich Environments Study; (G) C-rater Rules for Scoring Students' Search Queries; (H) TRE Search and Simulation Scale Scores and Percentiles by Student Reporting Groups for Scales on Which Statistically Significant Group Differences Were Observed; (I) Summary Statistics for Prior Knowledge Measures and Mean Scale Scores for Background-Question Response Options; (J) Performance on Problem Solving in Technology-Rich Environments (TRE) Observables; and (K) Understanding NAEP Reporting Groups. (Contains 116 figures and 44 tables.) [This report was written in collaboration with: Douglas Forer, Bruce Kaplan, Michael Wagner, and Lou Mang. The NAEP Problem Solving in Technology-Rich Environments (TRE) study was part of the Technology-Based Assessment (TBA) project, a collaborative effort led by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) and the National Assessment Governing Board, and carried out by Educational Testing Service (ETS) and Westat. The Problem Solving in TRE study is the last of three field investigations in the NAEP Technology-Based Assessment Project, which explores the use of new technology in administering NAEP. For previous investigations in this series, see ED485780.]
National Center for Education Statistics. Available from: ED Pubs. P.O. Box 1398, Jessup, MD 20794-1398. Tel: 877-433-7827; Web site: http://nces.ed.gov/help/orderinfo.asp
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Research
Education Level: Grade 8
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.; Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ.; Westat, Inc., Rockville, MD.
IES Funded: Yes