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ERIC Number: ED485842
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2005-Aug
Pages: 41
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Alternate Achievement Standards for Students with the Most Significant Cognitive Disabilities: "Non-Regulatory Guidance"
US Department of Education
This guidance provides States with detailed information about how best to use and implement alternate achievement standards. The development of alternate achievement standards for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities and their use for making adequate yearly progress (AYP) decisions is authorized under a Department regulation (34 C.F.R. Part 200) published on December 9, 2003. Since the publication of this regulation, the Department has announced its intention to issue a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that would permit States to assess certain students with disabilities based on modified achievement standards. Following the publication of the December 9, 2003 regulation, States raised a number of questions about: (1) alternate achievement standards; (2) alternate assessments; (3) the 1.0 percent cap on including proficient scores based on alternate achievement standards in AYP decisions; and (4) implementation practices for both States and local educational agencies (LEAs). This guidance provides answers to those and other relevant questions. The December 9, 2003 regulation and this guidance are designed to support two important goals: (1) ensuring appropriate inclusion of students with the most significant cognitive disabilities in State assessment and accountability systems; and (2) providing flexibility for schools, LEAs, and States in making AYP decisions. A Letter from Assistant Secretary Simon dated March 2, 2004 is appended.
ED Pubs, P.O. Box 1398, Jessup, MD 20794-1398. Tel: 877-433-7827 (Toll Free).
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Department of Education, Washington, DC.