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ERIC Number: ED485646
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2005-Jun
Pages: 6
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 9
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
SAMHSA Funding Opportunities for Afterschool: Substance Abuse Prevention and Mental Health Services. Funding Note
Dobbins, Dionne
Finance Project
Many children served in afterschool programs would be left alone in dangerous neighborhoods, potentially engaging in risky sexual and criminal behaviors, if not for their participation in structured programming. In fact, research has shown that students who spend the majority of their afterschool hours in unsupervised activities are more likely to drink, use drugs, smoke, and engage in other high-risk behaviors. Afterschool programs can help combat negative peer influences, strengthen student academic achievement, and provide students with safe and engaging activities that make drug use less attractive. In addition, afterschool programs may provide a targeted opportunity for direct prevention and treatment-oriented activities. This "Funding Note" focuses on the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the federal agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services created in 1992 to focus attention, programs, and funding on improving the lives of people with or at risk for mental and substance use disorders. Many of SAMHSA's principles and priority issues present opportunities for providers to both receive grants or partner with SAMHSA grantees to provide mental health and substance abuse prevention services through afterschool programming. SAMHSA's priority issues include: Workforce development; Co-occurring mental health and substance abuse disorders; Children and families; and Criminal justice. This "Funding Note" provides an overview of how SAMHSA's programs and funding are organized and the current priorities of the agency, with an emphasis on funding sources with relevance for afterschool. Funding sources and amounts may vary in coming years given changing funding priorities and appropriations.
The Finance Project, 1401 New York Avenue, NW, Suite 800, Washington, DC 20005. Tel: 202-587-1000; Fax: 202-628-4205; Web site: http://www.financeproject.org.
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Finance Project, Washington, DC.