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ERIC Number: ED477295
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2003
Pages: 14
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Frontiers in Civil Rights: Dorothy E. Davis, et al. versus County School Board of Prince Edward County, Virginia. Teaching with Documents.
National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC.
In 1951 Robert Russa Moton High School in Prince Edward County, Virginia was typical of the all-black schools in the central Virginia county. It housed twice as many students as it was built for in 1939, its teachers were paid less than teachers at the all-white high school, and it had no gymnasium, cafeteria, or auditorium with fixed seats. In April 1951 the students at Moton High School went on strike and asked for help from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's special counsel to persuade their local school board to build them a better school. This event led to a landmark civil rights case that marked the end of segregation in the nation's public schools. This "Teaching with Documents" lesson plan uses four historic documents that deal with this legal case as the basis for its activities. The lesson plan addresses standards correlation; cites constitutional connection and cross-curricular connections; provides four teaching activities; suggests three enrichment/extension activities; notes how to use the lesson for History Day entries; and offers a bibliography/suggestions for further reading. Contains a photograph analysis worksheet. (BT)
National Archives and Records Administration, 700 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20408. Tel: 866-325-7208. For full text: http://www.archives.gov/digital_classroom/lessons/davis_case/davis_case.html.
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Teacher
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners; Teachers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC.
Identifiers - Laws, Policies, & Programs: United States Constitution