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ERIC Number: ED476921
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2003-Apr
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
An Investigation of School-Level Factors for Students with Discrepant High School GPA and SAT Scores.
Kobrin, Jennifer L.; Milewski, Glenn B.; Everson, Howard; Zhou, Ying
This study used hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to examine student- and school-level predictors of the discrepancy between students standardized high school grade point average (HSGPA) and standardized total Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) scores. At the student level, academic curriculum intensity, socioeconomic status (SES), the difference between a students SAT mathematics and verbal scores (SATM-V), and gender were used to predict the HSGPA-SAT discrepancy within each school. Four factor scores (economic advantage, school size, computer technology, and school resources) based on a principal components analysis of 13 school-level variables were used to predict variation in the intercepts and slopes across schools. Data from the College Board for 18,674 students were used. All of the student-level variables except for curriculum intensity were significant predictors of discrepancy scores. Level-one intercepts as well as slopes for gender varied significantly across schools; the slopes for the other student-level variables did not. The school-level factor scores for economic advantage and school size significantly predicted a school's average discrepancy score (or level-one intercept), and the economic advantage factor also predicted a schools slope for gender. While several of the student-level variables were significant predictors of discrepancy scores, a substantial amount of the variance remained unexplained. This suggests that other variables not examined in this study are important predictors of the discrepancy between high school grades and SAT scores. (Contains 8 tables, 1 figure, and 23 references.) (Author/SLD)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A