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ERIC Number: ED476302
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2003-Apr
Pages: 50
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Gaining Ground, Moving Up: The Change in the Economic Status of Single Mothers under Welfare Reform. Civic Report.
O'Neil, June; Hill, M. Anne
This study is a follow-up of a 2001 study that examined changes in the welfare and work participation of single mothers. This study addresses whether single mothers earn enough to compensate for loss of benefits under welfare reform and the extent to which these women have access to income from sources other than their own earnings. Data come from the Current Population Survey and the Survey of Income and Program Participation. Results indicate that single mothers' poverty levels have reached record lows post-welfare reform. The reduction in poverty is particularly large among those groups of single mothers who have always had the highest poverty levels and welfare participation (black and Hispanic women, never married mothers, and high school dropouts). Welfare reform has led to a surge in the employment of single mothers and is the largest single factor responsible for the rise in single mothers' work participation. Single mothers' incomes rose significantly post-reform. On average, single mothers earned $11.60 per hour in 2001, which was considerably more than minimum wage. Single mothers did better economically the longer they were off welfare. Among single mothers who left welfare after 1994, each additional year worked between 1994-98 was associated with an increase in hourly pay of about 2 percent. (Contains 28 endnotes, 22 tables, and 9 figures.) (SM)
Center for Civic Innovation, Manhattan Institute, 53 Vanderbilt Avenue, New York, NY 10017. Tel: 212-599-7000; e-mail: mi@manhattan-institute.org; Web site: http://www.manhattan-institute.org.
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Manhattan Inst., New York, NY. Center for Civic Innovation.
Note: For the earlier study, see ED 463 389.