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ERIC Number: ED476003
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2003-Jan
Pages: 49
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Religion Matters: Predicting Schooling Success among Latino Youth. Interim Reports.
Sikkink, David; Hernandez, Edwin I.
This paper examines how religious practice and religious faith can protect Latino youth from problems in school and contribute to their academic success. Data were drawn from research on social capital and from three major national surveys with large samples of Latinos. Findings indicate that Latino students who actively attended church or who saw their religious faith as very important to their lives achieved higher grades in school; stayed on track in school; had less trouble with teachers, other students, and homework; and identified with school more strongly than did other Latino students. Religious practice was especially important for the educational success of Latino youth living in impoverished neighborhoods. Supervision of Latino teenagers--important for keeping youth on track in school--was strongly related to parents' religiosity. Moreover, religiously involved parents of Latino first graders spent more time with their children in ways important for educational development and for linking children to local organizations that provide educational opportunities. Not much evidence was found to support the notion that conservative Protestant Latinos form ethnic enclaves that hinder educational success. Any ethnic enclave effect in that group is perhaps offset by its high educational aspirations. Researchers, policymakers, and schools would do well to pay greater attention to resources that protect many Latino youth from downward assimilation. (Contains 86 references and 24 bar graphs) (TD)
Institute for Latino Studies, University of Notre Dame, Tel: 574-631-4440. For full text: http://www.nd.edu/~latino/research/pubs/Sikkink_paper.pdf.
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Pew Charitable Trusts, Philadelphia, PA.
Authoring Institution: N/A